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Remember to Call Big Foot Tree Service After a Difficult Winter Storm

Winter Storm DamageWinter weather is tough. One day it can be chilly, but clear and sunny, and later in the week, the weather can drastically turn and a major winter weather storm could bust through, and shred anything in its path. Even worse, a dreaded polar vortex could arrive any day, and cause a bit of disarray.

Winter storms can especially be a pain. Sure, having to shovel or plow your driveway and walkway can be a major inconvenience, but what makes owners even more fearful is the threat of property damage.

As homeowners, there are many things we can control to protect our investment; however, Mother Nature is not one of them. From frozen pipes that burst to tree limbs that were steamrolled into abyss by strong gusts of wind, your property is always at risk during a tough winter storm, and may leave you with a giant mess to clean up.

Should your property fall victim to a severe winter storm and you’re left with fallen branches, limbs, trunks and other debris, Big Foot Tree Service is here to help. Regardless of the time, day and month, we provide storm damage tree removal services and will clean up fallen branches and limbs. What’s more, should the storm cripple one of your trees and put it at risk to fall over, we will come and remove it for you, whenever you need us.

Let’s hope we won’t have to worry about severe winter storms and polar vortexes this year; but if we do and your property is covered with tree limbs, remember to contact Big Foot Tree Service.

The post Blog first appeared on Big Foot Tree Service. This post first appeared on https://www.bigfoottreeservice.com

Holly Plant: A Holiday Favorite that Shines in Winter

Holly is commonly seen during the holiday season. Even carols tell us to ‘Deck the halls with boughs of holly.’ The plant’s green leaves and red berries (though some cultivars do have berries with other colors) are a festive pop of color in interior décor. In the outdoor landscape, they are a bright and welcome sight on cold and gray winter days.

american holly

There are around 400 species in the holly (Ilex) genus including trees, shrubs and climbers. American holly is the one we most often associate with the holidays. While holly are generally slow-growing, some species are capable of obtaining heights of 80 feet or more!

Holly Characteristics

All parts of the plant, including the berries, are toxic to humans if consumed. However, they are an important food source for birds. The dense foliage is also a great hiding place from predators! In native areas, birds help the plant survive by dispersing seeds. Unfortunately, this can be a problem in non-native geographies. For example, along the west coast of North America, from California to British Columbia, holly has been spreading rapidly and crowding out forest species.

Holly plants are separately male and female. Males produce flowers, but no fruit. The familiar red fruits are on female plants. For the female to bear fruit, a male must be planted nearby. The fruits ripen in winter. They provide a nice color contrast to the glossy evergreen leaves.

Holly often grows as a shrub or in hedges. In open conditions, it can also form a small tree after growing for many years.

Growing and Caring for Holly

These plants thrive in full sun or partial shade and well-drained soil.

Hollies are susceptible to various leaf spot diseases. Infection results in leaf discoloration and eventual defoliation. Management of these disease is achievable as long as they are identified and treated in a timely manner. Root rot is another disease issue that is common. The best course of action is to maintain healthy soil conditions so that roots can continue to grow and thrive.

Some insect pests attack holly. A Certified Arborist can identify and treat infestations of aphids, scale, mites or holly leaf miner.

Overall, this is a great plant in its native range that brings color and beauty to a winter landscape.

The post Holly Plant: A Holiday Favorite that Shines in Winter first appeared on Tree Topics.

This post first appeared on https://www.bartlett.com/

Watch Out for Winter Tree & Shrub Problems

Imagine staying outside all of the time, even during winter. Exposed to severe weather, you’d face many problems. Even though trees live and grow outside, that doesn’t mean that the challenges of winter aren’t stressful for them too! Low temperatures, heavy snow, ice storms and other extremes cause a variety of winter injuries on landscape plants. It’s important to know what type of problems to look for during winter.

snowy branches

Low Temperature Injuries

Root damage can happen during prolonged cold spells, especially on shallow-rooted plants, container plantings and non-native plants. When roots die during this weather, the symptoms won’t appear until late winter or spring. At that point, foliage turns brown, buds die and the entire crown may wilt and die suddenly.

Low temperatures can also kill above-ground portions of plants. Again, non-native plants are most susceptible.  

Winter Drying   

Winter drying generally affects evergreens, particularly mountain laurel, rhododendron, azalea and holly. Plants continue to transpire water during winter. When the soil is frozen, that water cannot be replaced and the foliage dries out. As with injury from low temperatures, in late winter or spring, foliage will turn brown and buds will die.

Stem Splitting or “Frost Cracks”

Frost cracks generally occur on young, thin-barked trees like maple, sycamore or linden. The sudden drop in temperature from sunny, daytime highs to the very lows of nighttime causes stem tissues to shrink and wood to crack.

In severe instances, cracks can extend well into the heartwood, but usually, it is restricted to the outer few inches of wood. Frost cracks can be an entry point for decay on certain species.

Breakage from Snow and Ice Accumulation

The added weight of ice and snow can break branches. Heavy or long limbs, branches showing signs of decay, or those with a weak branch attachment are more vulnerable. This can also be an issue for evergreens, which have a large surface area to “hold” snow.

Deicing Salt Injuries

The salt (sodium chloride) commonly used as a deicing agent can splash onto plants or seep into soil. Salt spray dries out foliage and buds. In the soil, high levels of salt dries out, and can kill, plant roots.

Damage from Animals

Some animal activity during winter is harmful to trees and shrubs. Deer are one example. As other food sources become unavailable, deer turn to twigs and buds for sustenance. Further, deer injure trees by scraping their antlers against the trunk. This is called “buck rub.”

Small rodents and rabbits can also be problematic. These animals eat bark tissue around the lower stem and root collar during winter. This can result in tree death when feeding leads to girdling, where the bark is completely stripped from the tree.

The post Watch Out for Winter Tree & Shrub Problems first appeared on Tree Topics.

This post first appeared on https://www.bartlett.com/

5 Shrub Species for Your Alpharetta Georgia Garden

Sculpted shrubbery for your alpharetta georgia garden

Prevent your garden from looking neglected and ugly. Knowing which shrubs to plant in and around your garden will help protect it from severe weather and keep it looking sharp.

72tree.com gathered the following list of 5 ideal and hardy shrub species for your Alpharetta, Ga garden.

Alpharetta Georgia Gardens

Alpharetta, Georgia, gets approximately 53 inches of rain per year. That’s 15 inches more than the US average at 38 inches per year. This rainfall helps prevent drought and supports plant species growth throughout the year.

On average, Alpharetta sees about 220 sunny days per year. This promotes a healthy environment with ample opportunity for plants, shrubs, and trees to photosynthesize.

Alpharetta is entirely situated in USDA hardiness zone 7b. When selecting plant species for your Alpharetta garden, they should be cold-hardy for zone 7b for maximum growth and health potential.

The following are 5 shrub species selected specifically for Alpharetta, Ga:

1. Ixora Maui red (Ixora coccinea)

Ixora coccinea species for your alpharetta georgia garden

Ixora Maui Red grows as a dwarf, evergreen shrub thriving on heat and humidity. A shrubby, sprawling plant with many clusters of tubular, bright orange flowers displayed on the foliage in shades of bronze to incredible glistening dark shades of green.

While this species is hardy to zones 9 through 11, they can survive zone 7b winter temperatures if sheltered during the cold season.

2. Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)

Hydrangea macrophylla species for your alpharetta georgia garden

Hydrangeas include over 75 species in their genus and surpass 600 named cultivars native to multiple climates, regions, and countries. Another common name for hydrangea is hortensia. Hydrangeas can grow as climbing vines and trees but are most commonly found growing as a shrub. The plants can reach heights ranging from 1 foot to nearly 100 feet as a vine!

The showy flowers produced by this plant species are what make it so popular. Most put on a blooming display from early spring all the way into fall. The large flowers can come in a wide variety of shapes, colors, and sizes. Hydrangea blooms can be pink, blue, red, white, purple, and green (depending on the mineral content of the soil).

This flowering shrub can grow in partial shade to full sun and will thrive in hardiness zones 3 through 7.

3. Anise (Pimpinella anisum)

Pimpinella anisum species for your alpharetta georgia garden

Star anise is a quickly growing, evergreen shrub Capable of thriving in hardiness zones 7 through 10. Star anise shrubs can be grown as dense hedges or windbreaks, and they can also be pruned as a border plant. If allowed to, star anise will grow to a height of more than 15 feet and a width of over 10 feet. It tolerates both sun and shade but will grow significantly thinner in the shade.

In culinary terms, anise is used as a flavoring agent. It possesses a sweet, aromatic taste that highly resembles the taste of black licorice.

4. Arborvitae (Thuja)

Thuja species for your alpharetta georgia garden

With glistening emerald evergreen foliage and a classic narrow, pyramidal form, the arborvitae is a popular selection for gardeners looking to make a statement in all seasons.

The slow-growing arborvitae is an excellent selection for a specimen or accent tree. It serves well as a hedge tree, has the height to serve as efficient privacy screens, and makes a good foundation plant.

Hardy to zones 3 through 7, this species will add class and a sharpened look to your yard and garden.

5. Boxwood (Buxus)

Buxus species for your alpharetta georgia garden

Boxwood plants are dense, evergreen shrubs frequently planted in elegant and formal landscapes. This species is also popularly utilized in topiary. Boxwoods are grown for their foliage as their flowers lack any significance. Growing a boxwood shrub on your landscape allows you to create a topiary, a formal hedge, a matching border, or a pair of boxwood shrubs to balance out an entryway.

Boxwood is cold hardy to zones 5 through 9 and thrives in the Alpharetta, Ga area with little effort.

Growing Shrubs in Hardiness Zone 7b

In this article, you discovered 5 shrub species that grow well in the city of Alpharetta, Georgia, which is situated in hardiness zone 7b.

Knowing which shrub species to plant in your Alpharetta garden and landscape will help you maintain a sharp-looking and healthy ecosystem thriving year-round.

Haphazardly planting inappropriate species for Alpharetta’s cold hardiness can result in stunted growth, plant failure, disease, and insect infestations exploding over your landscape.

Sources:
extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=B625&title=Landscape%20Plants%20for%20Georgia
gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/ixora.html
gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/trees-and-shrubs/shrubs/star-anise-shrubs.html
arborday.org/trees/treeguide/treedetail.cfm?itemID=777
plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/buxus/

This article was first published on: http://www.72tree.com/5-shrub-species-for-your-alpharetta-georgia-garden/

How To Determine If A Tree Is Salvageable After A Bad Storm

Tree DamageTrees are beautiful additions to landscape designs, but when heavy storms come barreling through, damaged trees can actually become quite a nuisance and safety hazard. After a bad storm, you should take the time to inspect the tree for damage and determine if it’s salvageable or not.

Broken branches can be pulled away and usually have not affected the tree’s stability. But upon further inspection, you might become aware that there are actual structural damages that pose a threat to safety and landscape appeal.

Even though trees have the ability to recover from heavy winds and rain, you shouldn’t assume the tree is okay. Here are some tips to follow in order to determine if a tree is salvageable after a storm.

A tree can remain if the following is still apparent:

1. There are little to no missing or hanging branches. A tip: the larger the broken limb or the higher the number of missing limbs, the less likely the tree will be able to grow it back.

2. The tree’s leader is still intact. A missing leader can leave a tree looking deformed. (The leader is the main upward-trending branch on most trees.)

3. At least 50% of the tree’s branches and leaves are still attached A tree needs to produce enough foliage in order to properly nourish and survive.

4. There are no or a minimal number of large holes left behind from broken limbs or missing chunks of bark. Large holes can lead to pest invasion.

5. If there are any remaining branches, they can re-grow new branch structures overtime.

6. Where the tree is located is a safe distance and height from power lines.

If your area has been severely affected by a storm, you can assess your trees yourself, but it might be wiser to let a professional. A professional tree service like ours has the necessary tree knowledge in order to look over the factors that determine a tree’s strength. For more information, contact Big Foot Tree Service today.

 

The post Blog first appeared on Big Foot Tree Service. This post first appeared on https://www.bigfoottreeservice.com

Crack In Your Tree Trunk?

Cracks in your tree bark after the winter season could cause severe damage to your tree

Have you noticed cracks and splitting in the trunk of your tree? Is your foliage located in a spot with exposure to frigid winters? If so, it could be a frost crack! These appear as a vertical crack along the trunk of your tree. This damage can be dangerous to a tree because it is severe enough to split through the tree.

Luckily, with a few extra care steps throughout the year, you can prevent these and help your trees stay healthy and in one piece! Read on for advice on how to prevent and treat frost cracks.

Frost Crack Causes

These vertical cracks form when a tree trunk is exposed to extreme changes in temperature between winter and summer. The repeated heating and cooling can cause the molecules to slightly expand and contract just enough that a bark crack can form as a reaction to the extreme changes. Below are ways of helping your tree survive the winter months.

Reversing the Damage

If you notice the cracking, should you do anything about it? Not necessarily, because in most cases, the tree will be able to recover on its own through the natural processes of healing.

However, you can help it recover, and prevent a split trunk, by sealing the crack with plastic. The plastic seal protects the opening from potential infections caused by bacteria and pests. Be careful, though! You should remove any wrapping you place on the tree before summer. Otherwise, it may foster infections instead of preventing them.

Frost Crack Prevention Methods

Insulation – Because frost cracks arise from the changing temperature, you can help prevent the tree trunk from cracking by insulating the base.

Insulation includes wrapping the trunk with a thick protective layer. Ideally, you’d want to use something that would keep warmth, like a tarp, burlap, or cloth.

You can also help insulate your tree’s trunk by planting evergreen plants and bushes around the base. Keeping the bottom of the tree lush with plants and bushes will help keep it warm during the winter and prevent deep freezing.

Keep Trees Healthy – A healthy and vigorous tree will be more capable of healing after a crack and more resistant to bark cracking in the first place. Read on to learn ways to keep your foliage healthy.

Every summer, make sure you give the soil a fresh layer of fertilized dirt to mix into the already present substrate. On top of that, layer some mulch or bark pieces to help pack in the new soil. This mulch technique will also work as a form of insulation during the wintertime.

Watering your tree during dry winter periods is very important too. Even when it’s cold out, your foliage will need to have an ample water supply to stay healthy.

Pruning or trimming the foliage can also encourage it to sprout new healthy growth, improving its overall health status. However, you should hire a professional, as it can be dangerous to do it on your own.

Be Careful Where You Put Your Tree – Location plays a massive role in the health of your foliage during wintertime! To avoid having a split trunk, be careful that your tree is not exposed to strong winter winds because this will cause the bark to become even colder and has a higher chance of cracking.

Winter damage occurs on unprotected trees due to winter wind

Shallow and porous soil/substrate is a bad idea because of how important hydration is for your foliage in winter. Stick to locations where the tree’s roots can extend very far downward for more support and a healthier root system.

Choosing a location with a proven water-retaining soil system always works best. These locations already help your tree stay healthy enough to avoid cracks and heal any cracks that it may have in the future!

Trees Prone to Frost Cracks

Like all organisms, trees have adapted to survive in various climates. Some have adapted better than others to areas with intense winters and are less likely to experience a split trunk.

If you are undecided on what tree species to use, here are a few that are less resistant to winters and more likely to experience bark cracks:

• linden

• sycamore

• oak

• walnut

• willow

• maple

As a rule of thumb, the thinner the bark on the tree, the less resistant it is to cracks. In cold climates, choose trees with thick bark like aspens!

Final Thoughts

Frost cracks result from trees going through extreme cold and heat. The slight expansion and contraction of the molecules inside the tree result in the bark cracking on the surface of the tree.

If you see this happening, it is good to prevent infections and pest infestations by wrapping them in plastic. Consider insulating your tree trunk with either burlap, a tarp, or evergreen shrubbery to avoid cracking in general. Keep your tree healthy by fertilizing, watering, pruning, and adding a mulch layer.

If you keep these tips in mind when placing and taking care of your tree, you will be set for it to resist vertical cracks even in the harshest winters!

This article was first published on: http://www.72tree.com/crack-in-your-tree-trunk/

Best Types of Grass in Georgia

Grasses common to Georgia

When they’re getting a new lawn, people often don’t think hard enough about the type of grass they want to put down. There’s a wide range of grass types out there, varying in price, quality, and availability.

Whether you want something easy to maintain that the kids can play on, or a yard that looks great all year round, it’s important to know what landscaping options are available to you in Georgia. In this blog post, we’ll bring you a list of the top 7 types you can get in Georgia.

Georgia’s Climate

First, it’s essential to get a sense of the unique climate in Georgia to understand why not all types of grass in the US are suitable for landscaping here.

Situated in the South, Georgia is much better suited to what is known as warm-season grasses, that is, varieties that perform best when they are exposed to hotter temperatures with greater sunlight.

That’s why the majority of varieties on this list are warm-season grasses. toddsmariettatreeservices.com advises against buying cool-season grasses for landscaping unless you’re adding them to a mix with warm-season varieties.

1. Bahia Grass

Bahia grass is a resilient, coarse grass that’s especially useful for soil conditions with a poor level of nutrients. This type can survive where other varieties might not.

Bahia grass doesn’t mind being in the shade, so long as it’s exposed to a regular dose of sunlight.  You can leave the grass to grow two or three inches, meaning you won’t have to mow it every week.

2. Bermuda Grass

Bermuda grass is one of the oldest and most popular choices for lawns, thanks mainly to its resilience after heavy footfall. It’s especially ideal for sports fields. It’s fast-growing, though, so make sure you’ve got the time to mow it regularly.

Bermuda grass loves the sun, so it’s not the right choice for you if you have a lawn in a shady environment. And because it’s fast-growing, you’ve got to make sure you keep it in check by mowing regularly.

3. Centipede Grass

Centipede Grass has a moderate texture and is low-growing. It doesn’t even mind being in the shade for extended periods. Plus, this type is easy to manage and won’t grow out of control.

Don’t buy this variety if you’re looking for something that’ll grow fast – Centipede grass takes its time to reach its full potential. It’s also delicate and can’t withstand lots of activity.

4. St Augustine Grass

St Augustine Grass has a dark green color and a somewhat rough texture. Aside from being watered from time to time, this variety does not require lots of maintenance, and its blades can be left to grow. It doesn’t mind being left in the shade, either.

However, this isn’t the type of grass that can withstand lots of activity – it’s likely to get compacted and damaged if it’s trodden on regularly.

5. Zoysia Grass

Although it thrives best in hot, sunny conditions, Zoysia grass can also withstand cooler temperatures without any problems. This variety is soft to touch, and the blades usually grow together into densely-packed clusters.

However, don’t get Zoysia grass if you’re looking for something that’s low maintenance. This variety grows very quickly and is prone to spread into flowerbeds and other parts of your garden if it’s not carefully maintained.

6. Fescue Grass

fescue grass species is a popular lawn summer grass

Fescue Grass is best suited to areas deprived of shade, where other varieties might be unable to thrive. It has a smooth, thin shape which helps it grow quickly.

This variety is known for its resilience. It’s capable of surviving under a range of different temperatures and can withstand periods of drought. However, it does need regular watering in the summer, or it ends up receding and going dormant.

7. Blue Grama Grass

Blue Grama Grass is a bit of a wildcard on this list. It’s not a traditional type of grass used for lawns, and historically it was more likely to be found on unmanaged fields. However, it’s grown in popularity for garden landscaping in recent times due to its naturally unkempt appearance.

This grass type is not suitable to cover an entire lawn with, but it is useful as a decorative plant to surround the edges of a property or replace thin strips of grass in your garden. Best of all, it requires next to no maintenance, so you can let its long silky blades grow out to their full length.

Grasses In Georgia

Remember, the most critical factor in having an impressive, consistent lawn is the amount of time you spend on maintenance. Regardless of the grass type, no yard is going to look good if you neglect it.

That’s why when you choose a grass type for your landscaping, make sure you have a clear idea of how much time you’re able to commit to maintaining it, as some types require a lot more work than others.

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Fight Fire Blight with Pruning & Treatments

While tree diseases often thrive in spring, it is important to remember that proper care year-round can make a big difference in managing these issues. Some simple practices now can help combat disease. One good example is autumn and winter care to help control fire blight. Caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, fireblight commonly infects pear, apple, hawthorn and quince.

fire blight symptoms
The scorched leaves and “shepherd’s crook” that are telltale signs of fire blight.

Symptoms of Fire Blight

The disease gets the name “fire” blight because severely infected plants will have blackened or dark brown branches and foliage. Plant tissue can look as if it has been scorched or burned. The affected branches also often form a shepherd’s crook at the tip.

How Fire blight Spreads

Bees and wind-driven rain spread new infections during spring. These infections progress into the twigs and toward the main trunk. Once infected, cankers on trunks and branches can persist, where they serve as a source for future infections. Left untreated, cankers can completely girdle the cambium tissue. The result is the death of large branches or entire trees. The bacterium is active during the moist and humid weather of spring. After spring, the bacterium is normally dormant. However, symptoms in infected tissue can continue to worsen during this time.

Action to Combat Fire Blight

Management of fire blight requires sanitation and prevention. Pruning infected tissue should be performed when the bacterium is dormant and spread of disease has ceased. Please note that on highly susceptible trees and rapidly advancing infections, pruning below the branch cankers should be performed immediately to reduce severity – even when the disease is active.

Any leaves that have fallen from infected trees should be bagged and removed to help minimize re-infection.

Preventive treatments can also help protect healthy tissues from new infections. It is rare to get complete control over any plant disease but limiting infections through sanitation and prevention will limit dieback and avoid major infections that often lead to plant disfigurement or mortality. 

The post Fight Fire Blight with Pruning & Treatments first appeared on Tree Topics.

This post first appeared on https://www.bartlett.com/

Why Fall is a Smart Time to Prune Trees

There are a number of reasons for tree pruning; some are safety related, some are to lessen interference with buildings, and some protect the health of the tree. The need for pruning will depend on your own landscape goals as well as the trees themselves and surrounding property. Autumn is one of the best times to identify problem areas in a tree that could benefit from pruning.

autumn pruning

Stressed foliage often changes color earlier than foliage in the rest of a tree. Arborists can easily see the color change and help diagnose the cause. As the leaves fall, the structure of the tree will also become more visible. It becomes easier to see and identify structural defects that should be addressed. Any branches that are diseased or damaged may be good candidates for pruning.

Pruning Prepares Trees for Winter Weather

Winter storms, with or without snow and ice, all add stress to dead and broken branches in a tree. This can result in more of these branches falling during the winter. Dead and broken branch removal is one of the most common ways to prevent damage to houses or other objects beneath a tree.

Sometimes branches grow too close to roofs or siding, or they may grow too low over a sidewalk, driveway or lawn. As mentioned above, winter storms will certainly blow these branches around; no one wants a falling branch to injure someone or to damage a home or other building. Therefore, it is wise to have interfering branches removed, thinned, or reduced in length to lessen the problem.

Pruning at the Wrong Time can Attract Insects & Disease

Another factor to consider is that, in some areas, there are causal agents of disease spread by insects that are attracted to fresh pruning cuts. These insects are no longer flying in the late fall and winter, so this is the good time to prune susceptible species. If pruned now, trees including oak and elm will be less likely to contract diseases.

At Bartlett, we like to examine trees at this time of year and then apply our knowledge of tree structure, tree health, and pest problems to develop individual pruning plans to protect properties and improve the health and longevity of the trees.

The post Why Fall is a Smart Time to Prune Trees first appeared on Tree Topics.

This post first appeared on https://www.bartlett.com/

Bartlett Chairman Honored by Massachusetts Horticultural Society

The Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society (MHS) presented the George Robert White Medal of Honor to Robert A. Bartlett Jr., Chairman and CEO of Bartlett Tree Experts, on November 4, 2021 during the Society’s 119th Honorary Medals Dinner. During the ceremony, medals were awarded to individuals and organizations for their contributions to excellence in horticulture for the public good.

The George Robert White Medal of Honor was established in 1909 and is among the most distinguished horticultural awards in the United States. The first honoree was Charles Sprague Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum. Other recipients include Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, The Royal Horticultural Society, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Tasha Tudor. Joining these distinguished honorees, Bartlett represents the third generation of the F.A. Bartlett Tree Expert Company, the world’s leading scientific tree and shrub care company.

The post Bartlett Chairman Honored by Massachusetts Horticultural Society first appeared on Tree Topics.

This post first appeared on https://www.bartlett.com/

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